Climate Change and Natural Disasters

Many natural disasters are directly linked with the climate change including floods, hurricanes, heat waves, droughts, wildfires and storms. Such disasters have claimed more than 600,000 lives in the past two decades. The frequency and magnitude of these disasters are increasing with time and is not going to subside even with the plans of reducing our greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and signing of climate change agreement at Paris. UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction recorded an average of 335 weather-related disasters between 2005 and 2014, an increase of 14% from 1995-2004, and almost twice the level recorded during 1985-1995. According … Continue reading

How Natural Disasters Can Affect Businesses

Natural disasters are catastrophic events that result from processes that occur without human intervention. These adverse events include avalanches, landslides, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions. Floods, tsunamis, blizzards, and wildfires belong to this category as well. It is worth noting that the occurrence and intensity of natural disasters vary from country to country. Natural disasters have a significant impact on the economy and the businesses in more ways than one. Supply Chain Disruptions Efficient and reliable supply chains are critical to the success of a company. For example, the constant supply of milk is vital to the operations of a cheese-making … Continue reading

Climate Change Impacts in MENA

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is known for being one of the hottest places on Earth, and highly vulnerable to climate change impacts. In an IPCC special report on regional climate change, models projected that average temperatures in the region will increase by 1-2˚C by 2030-2050. Decision makers and citizens in all 21 countries realize that they are faced with an immediate need to reshape energy, agriculture, water and environmental policy to adapt to changing climate conditions. Steep Rise in Temperature Satellite data provided by Climate Engine from 1979 to present shows the mean max (average maximum) temperatures … Continue reading

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