About Salman Zafar

Salman Zafar is a renowned consultant, advisor, entrepreneur and writer with expertise in waste management, waste-to-energy, renewable energy, environment protection and sustainable development. He is the Founder of EcoMENA, in addition to being the CEO of consultancy firm BioEnergy Consult. Salman has successfully accomplished a wide range of projects in the areas of biomass energy, biogas, waste-to-energy and waste management. He has participated in numerous conferences and workshops as chairman, session chair, keynote speaker and panelist. Salman is a professional writer and is proactively engaged in creating mass awareness on renewable energy, waste management and environmental sustainability. He can be reached at salman@ecomena.org or salman@bioenergyconsult.com

The Paper Bag Boy of Abu Dhabi

Abdul Muqeet, also known as the Paper Bag Boy, has risen from being just another ordinary student to an extra-ordinary environmentalist. At just ten years old, Abdul Muqeet has demonstrated his commitment to saving the environment in United Arab Emirates and elsewhere. 

Inspired by the 2010 campaign “UAE Free of Plastic Bags”, Abdul Muqeet, a student of Standard V at Abu Dhabi Indian School, applied his own initiative and imagination to create 100% recycled carry bags using discarded newspapers. He then set out to distribute these bags in Abu Dhabi, replacing plastic bags that take hundreds of years to degrade biologically. The bags were lovingly named ‘Mukku bags' and Abdul Muqeet became famous as the Paper Bag Boy.

Abdul Muqeet’s environmental initiative has catalyzed a much larger community campaign. During the first year, Abdul Muqeet created and donated more than 4,000 paper bags in Abu Dhabi. In addition, he has led workshops at schools, private companies and government entities, demonstrating how to create paper bags using old newspapers. His school along with a number of companies in Abu Dhabi adopted his idea by exchanging their plastic bags for paper bags.

Abdul Muqeet was one of the youngest recipients of Abu Dhabi Awards 2011, for his remarkable contribution to conserve environment. The awards were presented by General Sheikh Mohammad Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Commander of the UAE Armed Forces. In 2011, Abdul Muqeet was selected to attend the United Nation’s Tunza conference in Indonesia where he demonstrated his commitment for a cleaner environment through his paper bag initiative. He is actively involved in spreading environmental awareness worldwide, especially UAE, India, USA and Indonesia.

 

Abdul Muqeet continues to make headlines for his concerted efforts towards a plastic-free environment, and has been widely covered by leading newspapers in UAE and other countries. He tirelessly campaigned for the Rio+20 summit, urging world leaders to commit to the Green Economy. “Plant more trees; use less water; reuse and recycle; always remember that everything in this world can be recycled but not time,” offers Abdul.

He has been remarkably supported by his parents and siblings throughout his truly inspiring environmental sojourn. Abdul Muqeet’s monumental achievements at such a tender age make him a torch-bearer of the global environmental movement, and should also inspire the young generation to protect the environment by implementing the concept of ‘Zero Waste’.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Fuel Pellets from Solid Wastes

MSW is a poor-quality fuel and its pre-processing is necessary to prepare fuel pellets to improve its consistency, storage and handling characteristics, combustion behaviour and calorific value. Technological improvements are taking place in the realms of advanced source separation, resource recovery and production/utilisation of recovered fuel in both existing and new plants for this purpose. There has been an increase in global interest in the preparation of Refuse Derived Fuel (or RDF) containing a blend of pre-processed MSW with coal suitable for combustion in pulverised coal and fluidised bed boilers.

Pelletization of Urban Wastes

Pelletization of municipal solid waste involves the processes of segregating, crushing, mixing high and low heat value organic waste material and solidifying it to produce fuel pellets or briquettes, also referred to as Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) or Process Engineered Fuel (PEF) or Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF). The process is essentially a method that condenses the waste or changes its physical form and enriches its organic content through removal of inorganic materials and moisture. The calorific value of RDF pellets can be around 4000 kcal/ kg depending upon the percentage of organic matter in the waste, additives and binder materials used in the process.

The calorific value of raw MSW is around 1000 kcal/kg while that of fuel pellets is 4000 kcal/kg. On an average, about 15–20 tons of fuel pellets can be produced after treatment of 100 tons of raw garbage. Since pelletization enriches the organic content of the waste through removal of inorganic materials and moisture, it can be very effective method for preparing an enriched fuel feed for other thermo-chemical processes like pyrolysis/ gasification, apart from incineration.

Pellets can be used for heating plant boilers and for the generation of electricity. They can also act as a good substitute for coal and wood for domestic and industrial purposes. The important applications of RDF in the Middle East are found in the following spheres:

  • Cement kilns
  • RDF power plants
  • Coal-fired power plants
  • Industrial steam/heat boilers
  • Pellet stoves

The conversion of solid waste into briquettes provides an alternative means for environmentally safe disposal of garbage which is currently disposed off in non-sanitary landfills. In addition, the pelletization technology provides yet another source of renewable energy, similar to that of biomass, wind, solar and geothermal energy. The emission characteristics of RDF are superior compared to that of coal with fewer emissions of pollutants like NOx, SOx, CO and CO2.

RDF production line consists of several unit operations in series in order to separate unwanted components and condition the combustible matter to obtain the required characteristics. The main unit operations are screening, shredding, size reduction, classification, separation either metal, glass or wet organic materials, drying and densification. These unit operations can be arranged in different sequences depending on raw MSW composition and the required RDF quality.

Various qualities of fuel pellets can be produced, depending on the needs of the user or market. A high quality of RDF would possess a higher value for the heating value, and lower values for moisture and ash contents. The quality of RDF is sufficient to warrant its consideration as a preferred type of fuel when solid waste is being considered for co-firing with coal or for firing alone in a boiler designed originally for firing coal.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Composting Guidelines for Beginners

It seems everyone is concerned about the environment and trying to reduce their “carbon footprint”.  Let us hope that this trend will continue and grow as a worldwide phenomenon.  Composting has been around for many years and is a great way to keep biodegradables out of the landfill and to reap the reward of some fabulous “black gold”.  That’s what master gardeners call compost and it’s great for improving your soil.  Plants love it. 
Check out few Rules to Remember About Composting.
  1. Layer your compost bin with dry and fresh ingredients: The best way to start a compost pile is to make yourself a bin either with wood or chicken wire.  Layering fresh grass clippings and dried leaves is a great start.
  2. Remember to turn your compost pile: As the ingredients in your compost pile start to biodegrade they will start to get hot.  To avoid your compost pile rotting and stinking you need to turn the pile to aerate it.  This addition of air into the pile will speed up the decomposition.
  3. Add water to your compost pile: Adding water will also speed up the process of scraps turning into compost.  Don’t add too much water, but if you haven’t gotten any rain in a while it’s a good idea to add some water to the pile just to encourage it along.
  4. Don’t add meat scraps to your pile: Vegetable scraps are okay to add to your compost pile, but don’t add meat scraps.  Not only do they stink as they rot, but they will attract unwanted guests like raccoons that will get into your compost bin and make a mess of it.
  5. If possible have more than one pile going: Since it takes time for raw materials to turn into compost you may want to have multiple piles going at the same time.  Once you fill up the first bin start a second one and so on.  That way you can allow the ingredient in the first pile to completely transform into compost and still have a place to keep putting your new scraps and clippings.  This also allows you to always keep a supply of compost coming for different planting seasons.
  6. Never put trash in your compost pile: Just because something says that it is recyclable it doesn’t mean that it should necessarily go into the compost bin.  For example, newspapers will compost and can be put into a compost pile, but you will want to shred the newspapers and not just toss them in the bin in a stack.  Things like plastic and tin should not be put into a compost pile, but can be recycled in other ways.
  7. Allow your compost to complete the composting process before using: It might be tempting to use your new compost in your beds as soon as it starts looking like black soil, but you need to make sure that it’s completely done composting otherwise you could be adding weed seeds into your beds and you will not be happy with the extra weeds that will pop up.
  8. Straw can be added if dried leaves are not available: Dried materials as well as green materials need to be added to a compost bin.  In the Fall you will have a huge supply of dried leaves, but what do you do if you don’t have any dried leaves?  Add straw or hay to the compost bin, but again these will often contain weed seeds so be careful to make sure they are completely composted before using them.
  9. Egg Shells and Coffee grounds are a great addition: Not only potato skins are considered kitchen scraps.  Eggshells and coffee grounds are great additions to compost piles because they add nutrients that will enhance the quality of the end product.
  10. Never put pet droppings in your compost pile: I’m sure you’ve heard that manure is great for your garden, but cow manure is cured for quite a while before used in a garden.  Pet droppings are far to hot and acidic for a home compost pile and will just make it stink.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

قصص ملهمة – القصة الثانية: ربى الزعبي – ملهمة الابتكار الأخضر والريادة في العمل المجتمعي

rubaalzubi_inspiremenaالمهندسة ربى الزعبي، قيادية وخبيرةٌ معروفة في السياسات البيئية والحوكمة والتخطيط في مجال التنمية المستدامة وتعتبرُ مصدرَ إلهامٍ حقيقيٍّ للشبابِ في الأردن وخارجه. تشغل الزعبي حاليا منصب المدير التنفيذي لجمعية إدامة (EDAMA) وهي منظمة غير ربحية اردنية تمثل إحدى أوائل جمعياتِ الأعمالِ المعنية  بإيجاد حلولٍ مبتكرةٍ في قطاعات الطاقة والمياه والبيئة وتحفيز الاقتصاد الاخضر. ربى الزعبي سفيرة  (قرارات عالمية Global Resolutions) في الأردن وعضوة في شبكة النفع المجتمعي (Plus Social Good) التي تحاول تعزيزِ الوعي ونشرِ قصصِ النجاحَ المتعلقة بالأهداف العالمية للتنمية المستدامة في منطقة الشرق الأوسط وشمال إفريقيا MENA.

وتعتبرُ المهندسة ربى الزعبي من الناشطين في العمل التطوعي وهي أحد مؤسسي المجلس الأردني للأبنية الخضراء  حيث نسقت مرحلة التأسيس ووضع الخطط والتوجهات الاستراتيجية للمجلس مع بقية زملائها أعضاء الهيئة التأسيسية. كما قادت الزعبي قطاع التكنولوجيا النظيفة ضمن برنامج التنافسية الأردني الممول من والذي هدف الى تعزيز القدرة التنافسية للقطاع الخاص وخلق مزيدٍ من فرص العمل وزيادة الصادرات في قطاعات الطاقة النظيفة وإدارة النفايات الصلبة و إدارة المياه.

كما تم اختيارها للمشاركة عن الاردن في برنامج زمالة أيزنهاور للقادة  للعام 2012 حيث تركز برنامجها على مجالات الاقتصاد الأخضر والمباني الخضراء وسياسات الاستدامة في الولايات المتحدة الأمريكية. وتم اختيارها في زمالة وارد وييل-لوك Ward Wheelock Fellow عام 2012 لإسهاماتها البارزة في القطاع البيئي وفي مجتمعها بشكل عام. وترتبط المهندسة ربى الزعبي مع منظمة إيكومينا EcoMENA كمرشدة، حيث قدمت دعما هائلاً للمنظمة برفع مستوى الوعي البيئي وتحفيز الشباب ونشر المعرفة.

وهنا تتحدث ربى لأحد شركائنا إمباكت سكويرد Impact Squared حول خلفيتها التعليمية وأبرز إنجازاتها المهنية وكذلك  رؤيتها وتوجهاتها الاستراتيجية.

 

سؤال: هل يمكنكِ أن تُخْبرينا نبذةً بسيطةً عن نفسك وما هو مجال عملك؟

اكملت دراستي كمهندسة مياه وبيئة ، ولاحظت خلال دراستي للهندسة بعدم وجود ترابط بين ماندرسه  ويين التنمية والمجتمع. ومنذ ذلك الحين وأنا أحاول باستمرار تعزيز ذلك الترابط بينهما. عندما تم الإعلان عن تأسيس وزارة البيئة في الأردن عام 2004، حظيت بفرصة المشاركة في وضع وتنفيذ خطط التطوير المؤسسي للوزارة وتحديث توجهاتها الاستراتيجية في مجال التنمية المستدامة، حيث تلقيتُ وقتها الدعمَ والتأييدَ مباشرة من وزير البيئة انذاك والذي كان يؤمن بتمكين المرأة . ب شجعتني هذه التجربة على الحصول   على تدريب متخصص وشهادة في إدارة التغيير المؤسسي لأكون  اكثر قدرة على المساهمة في تطوير القطاع العام في الأردن. أما الآن، فأشغل منصب المديرة التنفيذية  لجمعية إدامة EDAMA ، وهي منظمة غير ربحية تهدف إلى تحفيز القطاع الخاص للمساهمة في الوصول  الى الاقتصاد الأخضر في الأردن والمضي  قُـدُماً في إيجاد حلولٍ مبتكرةٍ ضمن قطاعات الطاقة والمياه والبيئة.

سؤال: ما هي أكبر التحديات أو المشكلات التي تواجهك في عملك؟

هناك قضية كبيرة تواجه العالم بأسره اليوم وتعتبر من أبرز التحديات التي تواجه برامج التنمية المستدامة الا وهي دمج مفاهيم الاستدامة  في التنمية.، ويتضمن ذلك ادراج اهداف وتطبيقات الاستدامة البيئية ضمن مختلف القطاعات والقرارات المتعلقة بالتنمية. نضطر الى المفاضلة  في الكثير من الاحيان.   في الدول النامية  يصعب وضع الاستدامة البيئية في اعلى سلم الأولويات باستمرار، إلا أنه يجب مراعاة كلفة المفاضلة  والخيارات التي نفاضل بينها  خلال  عمليات صنع القرار.

كما أعتقد بأن مسائل أخرى  مثل تكافؤ الفرص والتطوير الوظيفي وسد الفجوة بين التعليم وفرص العمل المطلوبة في السوق جميعها تعتبر من القضايا ذات الأولوية.

حالياً، وبكل أسف لا يوجد الكثير من الابتكار في القطاعات الخضراء، حيث نفتقر إلى وجود الزخم المطلوب للمساعدة على الابتكار في هذا المجال بالذات، ويرجع السبب في ذلك ليس لقلة الموارد الداعمة والمحفزة لمزيد من الإبداع والابتكار الأخضر، بل إلى عدم فهم احتياجات السوق وقلة إدراك العوامل المؤثرة فيه. لا بد من دعم أالرياديين وصحاب المبادرات الخضراء لييتمكنوا من الابتكار من اجل تحقيق الاستدامة . ان الرؤية التي ابقي امام عيني تتضمن هذه القضايا واحاول  كلما سنحت لي الفرصة ان اسلط الضوء على كافة تلك التحديات والمفاهيم ا بهدف حشد الدعم العالمي والوصول إلى تأثير فعلي على نطاق واسع.

سؤال: ما هي  المحفزات التي دفعتك لمواصلة  مسيرتكِ المهنيَّة   وماهي العوامل التي تساعدك على الاستمرار؟

لقد عملت في القطاعين العام والخاص والمنظمات الدولية والجهات المانحة. وارغب حقيقة في العمل في أالمكان الذي يمكنني من أن اترك قيمة مضافة وأثر مستدام.  واعتبر عملي الآن لدى منظمة غير ربحية تحدياً وذلك بسبب الحاجة الدائمة إلى توفير مصادر تمويل لضمان الاستدامة المالية للمنظمة، الا انه لابد من أن نكون قريبين بشكل كبير من الناس والمجتمع حيث تكمن الاحتياجات الحقيقية. إن العمل في جمعية إدامة له ميزة إضافية تتمثل في العمل مع القطاع الخاص ويمكنني من هذا الموقع  تعزيز الربط ما بين المجتمعات المحلية القطاع الخاص وهو جانب واعد لنا في الأردن.

ruba-al-zubi

 كلما فطرنا أكثر في الطاقة المستدامة التي يمكن أن نقدمها للجميع، خصوصاً في ظل الظروف الراهنة التي ألقت بظلالها على المنطقة بشكل عام وتأثر بها الأردن بشكل خاص وتدفق مئات الآلاف من اللاجئين السوريين إلى الأردن، كلما تمكنا من تخفيف الضغط على الاقتصاد والموارد الطبيعية.

سؤال: كيف تنظرين الى موضوع القيادة ؟ وما هي المهارات والقيم الواجب توفرها في القيادِيِّ الناجح؟

قمت مؤخراً باصطحاب فريقي لتناول الافطار، حيث ذكر لي أعضاء فريقي بأنهم يستيقظون صباحاً وهم سُـعَـداء لأنهم يشعرون بالتمكين والتقدير.  نوفر في ادامة مساحة لعضاء الفريق للإبداع والابتكار والمشاركة في اتخاذ القرار بعيدا عن التنفيذ الحرفي لافكار الغير حيث أعتبر ان هذا التوجه من اهم العوامل الواجب توافرها في المنظمات غير الربحية الرائدة.   ر.  كقائدة يهمني للغاية خلق مجتمعٍ صغيرٍ يُـمَـكِّـنُ أعضاءه من خلق مجتمعات اكبر حول القضايا التي نعمل من اجل تحسينها وتطويرها.  . اذا فشلنا في خلق مجمع داخلي صغير لن ننجح في التأثير على المجتمع الخارجي الأكبر.

أردد على الدوام أنني اتمنى لو كان لي مرشد في مرحلة مبكرة من مشواري العملي- حيث لم يكن هذا الموضوع شائعاً عندما كنت أصغر سناً. لدي الآن اكثر من مرشد وانا ايضا مرشدة لعدد من الشباب والفتيات  أعتقد بأن مثل هذه العلاقات هامة جدا .  ومن المهم ايضا للمرشد  ان يعرف كيف  يوصل دعمه للشخص المتلقي للارشاد لكن دون التأثير على قراراته. أستمتع حين ارشد شخصا ما ليجد الطريق وكم كنت أتمنى لو كان لدي في بداية حياتي العملية شخصا  يرشدني  بنفس الاسلوب. كذلك فان دعم الأسرة والأصدقاء يساهم في تعزيز روح القيادة. فكلما زاد ارتياحنا في الحياة الشخصية كلما استطعنا أن نعطي أكثر للمجتمع وعلى المستوى المهني. أعتبر نفسي محظوظةً لوجود هذه الميزة في حياتي.

 تمتعت بالقيادة من مواقع مختلفة ولم اتجاوز الثلاثين من العمر ولهذا مميزات وسلبيات. اذا لم يكن القائد على المستوى المطلوب من النضج فقد ينعكس ذلك سلبا على نظرة الناس له ولكل القادة الشباب بشكل عام.  لذلك من الأهمية بمكان أن يجد القائد الوقت للتوقف والنظر والتقييم الذاتي للتطور الشخصي والمهارات المكتسبة بين الفترة والأخرى. التعلم من التجربة الذاتية هام لتكوين قيادات فاعلة. يحتاج النضوج المهني والشخصي الى وقت … هذا ما أحاول باستمرار ان اوضحه للاجيال الشابة التي قد يقودها الاندفاع الى الرغبة في تسلق السلم بسرعة كبيرة.

سؤال: كقيادية، ما هي القِـيَـم والمبادئ التي  تقود عملية اتخاذ القرارات  لديك؟

بشكل عام، أحاول تطبيق القيم والمبادئ الاجتماعية والبيئية التي أؤمن بها. أقدر شخصيا قيم العدالة الاجتماعية وتكافؤ الفرص  والعدالة المبنية على النوع الاجتماعي، والتي أدى عدم مراعاتها  الى ما آلت اليه الاوضاع في منطقتنا العربية.

اذا لم نستطع كقادة مراعاة ودمج هذه القيم في حياتنا الشخصية ومن ثم المهنية، فلن يتم تطبيق هذه المبادئ على أرض الواقع وعبر المستويات المختلفة.

 

ملاحظة: تم إعادة نشر هذه المقابلة بالتنسيق مع شريك  إيكومينا EcoMENAإمباكت سكويرد Impact Squared، يمكنكم قراة النص الأصلي للمقابلة هنا.

 

ترجمه

جعفر أمين فلاح العمري

جعفر العمري، أردني مقيم منذ عام 2011 في الرياض- المملكة العربية السعودية، مهتم بمجال إدارة المشاريع ويخطط لتقديم امتحان شهادة إدارة المشاريع الاحترافية PMP. لديه خبرة واسعة تجاوزت 12 عاماً كمهندس في المشاريع الهندسية المتخصصة في قطاعات المياه والبيئة، في مجالات: التخطيط والإدارة والتنمية، والعمل كجزء من فريق متكامل في العديد من الشركات والمنظمات العربية والدولية.

Saudi Arabia Biorefinery from Algae (SABA) Project

The King Abdulaziz City for Science & Technology (KACST) is funding an innovative project called Saudi Arabia Biorefinery from Algae (SABA Project) to screen for lipid hyper-producers species in Saudi Arabia coastal waters. These species will be the basis for next-generation algal biofuel production. The goal of this project is to increase research and training in microalgae-based biofuel production as well algal biomass with an additional goal of using a biorefinery approach that could strongly enhance Saudi Arabia economy, society and environment within the next 10 years.

The primary mission of the SABA project is to develop the Algae Based Biorefinery – ABB biotechnology putting into operation innovative, sustainable, and commercially viable solutions for green chemistry, energy, bio-products, water conservation, and CO2 abatement. Microalgae are known sources of high-value biochemicals such as vitamins, carotenoids, pigments and anti-oxidants. Moreover, they can be feedstocks of bulk biochemicals like protein and carbohydrates that can be used in the manufacture of feed and food.

The strategic plan for SABA project is based on the achievement of the already ongoing applied Research, Technology Development & Demonstration (RTD&D) to the effective use of microalgae biomass production and downstream extraction in a diversified way, e.g. coupling the biomass production with wastewater bioremediation or extracting sequentially different metabolites form the produced biomass (numerous fatty acids, proteins, bioactive compounds etc.). This interdisciplinary approach including algal biology, genetic engineering and technologies for algae cultivation, harvesting, and intermediate and final products extraction is crucial for the successful conversion of the developed technologies into viable industries.

The first phase of this project entitled “Screening for lipid hyper-producers species in Saudi Arabia coastal waters for Biofuel production from micro-Algae” will build the basis for large scale system to produce diesel fuel and other products from algae grown in the ocean with a strong emphasis on building know-how and training. It will ultimately produce competitively priced biofuel, scaling up carbon capture for a range of major environmental, economic, social and climate benefits in the Kingdom and elsewhere. The project lends itself to an entrepreneurial new venture, working in partnership with existing firms in the oil and gas industry, in energy generation, in water supply and sanitation, in shipping and in food and pharmaceutical production.

The project is gaining from cross-disciplinary cutting edge Research, Technology Development & Demonstration for the industrial implementation of the fourth generation algae-based Biorefinery. The technology development is supported by a consortium of engineers, researchers in cooperation with industry players (to ensure technology transfer), international collaborators (to ensure knowledge transfer) and the Riyadh Techno Valley (to promote spin-off and commercialization of results). 

Since the research topic is innovative in the Kingdom research circles, a strong research partnership was promptly developed by the King Saud University / King Abdulah Institute for Nanotechnology with international distinguished research centers with proved successful experience in this technology development. The Centre of Marine Science (CCMAR) and the Institute of Biotechnology and Bioengineering (IBB) both from Portugal are a guarantee to the successful research-based technology development in the SABA project development and the effective capacity-building for Saudi young researchers and technicians.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Energy Perspectives for Jordan

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is an emerging and stable economy in the Middle East. Jordan has almost no indigenous energy resources as domestic natural gas covers merely 3% of the Kingdom’s energy needs. The country is dependent on oil imports from neighbouring countries to meet its energy requirements. Energy import costs create a financial burden on the national economy and Jordan had to spend almost 20% of its GDP on the purchase of energy in 2008.

In Jordan, electricity is mainly generated by burning imported natural gas and oil. The price of electricity for Jordanians is dependent on price of oil in the world market, and this has been responsible for the continuous increase in electricity cost due to volatile oil prices in recent years. Due to fast economic growth, rapid industrial development and increasing population, energy demand is expected to increase by at least 50 percent over the next 20 years.

Therefore, the provision of reliable and cheap energy supply will play a vital role in Jordan’s economic growth. Electricity demand is growing rapidly, and the Jordanian government has been seeking ways to attract foreign investment to fund additional capacity. In 2008, the demand for electricity in Jordan was 2260 MW, which is expected to rise to 5770 MW by 2020.

In 2007, the Government unveiled an Energy Master Plan for the development of the energy sector requiring an investment of more than $3 billion during 2007 – 2020. Some ambitious objectives were fixed: heating half of the required hot water on solar energy by the year 2020; increasing energy efficiency and savings by 20% by the year 2020, while 7% of the energy mix should originate from renewable sources by 2015, and should rise to 10% by 2020. 

Concerted efforts are underway to remove barriers to exploitation of renewable energy, particularly wind, solar and biomass. There has been significant progress in the implementation of sustainable energy systems in the last few years to the active support from the government and increasing awareness among the local population.

With high population growth rate, increase in industrial and commercial activities, high cost of imported energy fuels and higher GHGs emissions, supply of cheap and clean energy resources has become a challenge for the Government. Consequently, the need for implementing energy efficiency measures and exploring renewable energy technologies has emerged as a national priority.  In the recent past, Jordan has witnessed a surge in initiatives to generate power from renewable resources with financial and technical backing from the government, international agencies and foreign donors. 

The best prospects for electricity generation in Jordan are as Independent Power Producers (IPPs).  This creates tremendous opportunities for foreign investors interested in investing in electricity generation ventures. Keeping in view the renewed interest in renewable energy, there is a huge potential for international technology companies to enter the Jordan market.  There is very good demand for wind energy equipments, solar power units and waste-to-energy systems which can be capitalized by technology providers and investment groups.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What are Biofuels

The term ‘Biofuel’ refers to liquid or gaseous fuels for the transport sector that are predominantly produced from biomass. A variety of fuels can be produced from biomass resources including liquid fuels, such as ethanol, methanol, biodiesel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, and gaseous fuels, such as hydrogen and methane. The biomass resource base for biofuel production is composed of a wide variety of forestry and agricultural resources, industrial processing residues, municipal solid wastes and urban wood residues.

The agricultural resources include grains used for biofuels production, animal manures and residues, and crop residues derived primarily from corn and small grains (e.g., wheat straw). A variety of regionally significant crops, such as cotton, sugarcane, rice, and fruit and nut orchards can also be a source of crop residues. The forest resources include residues produced during the harvesting of forest products, fuelwood extracted from forestlands, residues generated at primary forest product processing mills, and forest resources that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health. Municipal and urban wood residues are widely available and include a variety of materials — yard and tree trimmings, land-clearing wood residues, wooden pallets, organic wastes, packaging materials, and construction and demolition debris.

Globally, biofuels are commonly used to power vehicles, heat homes, and for cooking. Biofuel industries are expanding in Europe, Asia and the Americas. Biofuels are generally considered as offering many priorities, including sustainability, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, regional development, social structure and agriculture, and security of supply. 

First Generation Biofuels

First-generation biofuels are made from sugar, starch, vegetable oil, or animal fats using conventional technology. The basic feedstocks for the production of first-generation biofuels come from agriculture and food processing. The most common first-generation biofuels are:

  • Biodiesel: extraction with or without esterification of vegetable oils from seeds of plants like soybean, oil palm, oilseed rape and sunflower or residues including animal fats derived from rendering applied as fuel in diesel engines
  • Bioethanol: fermentation of simple sugars from sugar crops like sugarcane or from starch crops like maize and wheat applied as fuel in petrol engines
  • Bio-oil: thermo-chemical conversion of biomass. A process still in the development phase
  • Biogas: anaerobic fermentation or organic waste, animal manures, crop residues an energy crops applied as fuel in engines suitable for compressed natural gas.

 

First-generation biofuels can be used in low-percentage blends with conventional fuels in most vehicles and can be distributed through existing infrastructure. Some diesel vehicles can run on 100 % biodiesel, and ‘flex-fuel’ vehicles are already available in many countries around the world.

Second Generation Biofuels

Second-generation biofuels are derived from non-food feedstock including lignocellulosic biomass like crop residues or wood. Two transformative technologies are under development.

  • Biochemical: modification of the bio-ethanol fermentation process including a pre-treatment procedure
  • Thermochemical: modification of the bio-oil process to produce syngas and methanol, Fisher-Tropsch diesel or dimethyl ether (DME).

Advanced conversion technologies are needed for a second generation of biofuels. The second generation technologies use a wider range of biomass resources – agriculture, forestry and waste materials. One of the most promising second-generation biofuel technologies – ligno-cellulosic processing (e. g. from forest materials) – is already well advanced. Demonstration plants have already been established in Denmark, Spain and Sweden.

Third Generation Biofuels

Third-generation biofuels may include production of bio-based hydrogen for use in fuel cell vehicles from microalgae. The production of Algae fuel, also called Oilgae is supposed to be low cost and high-yielding – giving up to nearly 30 times the energy per unit area as can be realized from current, conventional ‘first-generation’ biofuel feedstocks. Algaculture can be an attractive route to making vegetable oil, biodiesel, bioethanol and other biofuels.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

كفاءة الطاقة في الإمارات العربية المتحدة

إمارة أبو ظبي , هي الوحيدة في مجال انتاج 10.000 ميجاواط من الكهرباء و للمرة الأولى , و بالحديث عن تحسين كفاءة الطاقة في الإمارات العربية المتحدة , الموضوع أصبح يأخذ منحناً جدياً  حيث أن الإستهلاك اليومي للطاقة في أشهر الصيف الحارّة مازال يعاني من النمو المتزايد من سنة إلى أخرى , مع ذروة حاجة وصلت إلى 12 بالمئة . مع غصة كبيرة تركتها نسب استهلاك كبيرة سببها مكيفات الهواء , والتي تشكل نصف الإستهلاك العام من الكهرباء في المنطقة .

إجراءات الحكومة و القطاع التجاري

حسب المستويات التجارية , هناك خطوات ملحوظة تؤخذ للحد من ما يعرف ب " بصمة الكربون " الإماراتية . نظام عزل المباني في إمارة دبي أدى إلى حدوث العديد من المطالبات التي صرحت بأن هذه المباني تستهلك ضعف كفاءة الطاقة منذ تطبيق هذا النظام . هناك خطوات إضافية تجري في مساحات بيئية أخرى مثل كفاءة المياه و إدارة المخلفات مع نيّة في تعزيز الإعتماد على الأنظمة صديقة البيئة لكل مبنى يوافق المعايير و المقاييس البيئة العالمية .

على المستوى الرسمي واصلت هيئة المواصفات و المقاييس الإماراتية تنفيذ برنامج " توحيد كفاءة الطاقة و تصنيفها –Energy Efficiency Standardization and Labelling (EESL ) " . هذا سيعرّفالكفاءة المحددة و التصنيفات المطلوبة لمكيفات هواءغير الأنبوبية  في عام 2011 .

هذه المقاييس ستنضم هذه السنة للمتطلبات الواقعة تحت نفس النظام للعديد من السلع الكهربائية المنزلية بما فيها المصابيح , الغسالات و أجهزة التبريد .المتطلبات التصنيف هذه ستصبح تحت غطاء هذا النظام بشكل إلزامي في حلول عام 2013 لتمكن المستهلك من معرفة أي هذه الأجهزة قد يكون ذو كفاءة أفضل و تشكيل صورة جيدة عن مجموعة خيارات صديقة للبيئة قد تساعده في توفير نقوده على تكاليف التشغيل .نظام (EESL)  سيمتد في عام 2013  ليشمل مكيفات الهواء الأنبوبية و البرّادات .

قطاع النفط و الغاز الإماراتي ايضاً يدرك أهمية أجندة كفاءة الطاقة . قد يبدو أمراً غير متوقع أن يتم التفكير بكيفية حفظ الطاقة بوجود قطاع النفط و احتياطه الذي يصل إلى 97 برميلاً و الغاز 6 تريليون متر مكعب من احتياطي الغاز الطبيعي .القضية هي بأن هذه الإحتياطيات بالرغم من حجمها فهي ليست محدودة , وأن واردات تصدير النفط للخارج أكبر من عرضها في السوق المحلي . و من أجل هذا الغرض , فإن قطاع الغاز و النفط مهتم بالعمل أكثر مع الذين يحاولون خفض الإستهلاك المحلي , مما يؤدي إلى استدامة هذا القطاع بشكل أطول .

جائزة الطاقة الإماراتية أنشأت في عام 2007للتعرف على أفضل طرق تمارس في مجال حفظ الطاقة و إدارتها و التي تعكس الإبتكار , الفعالية من ناحية التكاليف و تدابير كفاءة الطاقة القابلة للتكرار . و بعض هذه الممارسات المتعارف عليها يجب أن تكون ذات تأثير على منطقة الخليج العربي  لتحريك التوعية في مجال الطاقة بشكل واسع و علىكافة شرائح  المجتمع .

أهمية تغيير السلوك

المبادرات الرسمية والبرامج لها مكانها في معركة الحفاظ على كفاءة الطاقة في الإمارات , يجب أن يكون هناك نقلة نوعية شاملة في الثقافة تجاه هذا الموضوع من قبل المواطنين . تحسين الإدراك لدى المجتمع في مجال القضايا البيئية و تحسين التصرفات البيئية و التي لها دور داعم في مجال كفاءة الطاقة ممكن أن يساهم بشكل ملحوظ تجاه الهدف الرئيسي المنشود .

كما تزداد أسعار النفط في الأسواق المحلية , فإن المواطنين الإماراتيين يزيدون العبء على كفاءة البنزين اخذين بعين الإعتبار أنواع السيارات التي يبتاعونها . إن سيارات الدفع الرباعي تتصدر المرتبة الأولى من ناحية المبيعات في الإمارات لكن ميزانيات الأسر تزداد و العديد من الأسر عادية يبحثون عن مركبات صغيرة و أكثر كفاءة . ربما للمرة الأولى تكون تكلفة التشغيل المجملة للسيارات أُخذَت بعين الإعتبار و أصبح تجار السيارات يتطلعون إلى استيعاب أذواق زبائنهم . هذا التوجه الدارج أصبح ملحوظاً حيث أن بعض تجار السيارات لديهم رؤيا قوية بأن يزداد سنويا بيع السيارات الصغيرة و صاحبة الكفاءة العالية .

و تجار السيارات في دبي أيضا لديهم نفس الرؤيا , حيث أنه هناك واحد على الأقل يقوم باستئجار سيارة ذات مواصفات محافظة على البيئة تجذب انتباه شريجة جيدة من المجتمع , كما أن هناك شركات Chevrolet Voltsو Nissanأتاحت فرصة استئجار و تأجير  سيارات كهربائة بشكل سهل .

إن الإستفادة من هذه التوجهات يجعل قطاع التجارة و البيئة مدرَكين بشكل ملحوظ لكن رواد الإقتصاد وحدهم لا يستطيعون تغيير تصرفات المجتمع . هناك العديد من التدابير البسيطة التي يمكن للحكومة و الاقتصاديين إتخاذها لتحفيز المواطنين و تشجيعهم لاتخاذها . بعضهم يعترض أن إطفاء جهاز الحاسوب , الأضاءة و مكيفات الهواء عند الإنتهاء من العمل ربما قد يحفظ الطاقة لكنه ليس كافيا  او مجديا – التدابير الطوعية من هذا النوع لا تؤثر على اتجاهات الطاقة عموما .

و لكن هناك أدلة بأنه إن أضيفت هذه السلوكيات إلى مجمل التدابير كتركيب الإضاءة الوفرة للطاقة , خفض الحرارة و تحسين مكيفات  EESL  الهوائية , سيكون حفظ الطاقة ملحوظا – أي من المحتمل تخفيض استهلاك المبنى للطاقة .

مبدأ حفظ الطاقة لم يشق طريقه بشكل قوي في الإمارات , لكن التغيرات السريعة الملحوظة تنبئ بالمزيد القادم . برامج كفاءة الطاقة الرسمية و التدابير الطوعية ستجتمع لمساعدة الإمارات على إبقاء وضعها الإقتصادي قوياً في المنطقة , و بفعل ذلك لن تصبح هذه الأجندة بعيدة عن التحقيق .

ترجمة 

عبدالله دريعات – منسق مشروع في  منظمة ايكوبيس/ أصدقاء الارض الشرق الاوسط – مهتم في مجال البيئة والمياه و  التغير المناخ 

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Recycling of PET Plastic Wastes

Like all other modern urban centers, the Middle East also faces challenges in environmental protection due to tremendous tonnage of waste produced in different forms. The gross urban waste generation from Middle East countries exceeds 150 million tons per annum, out of which 10-15 percent is contributed by plastic wastes. The burgeoning population, growing consumption, and an increasing trend towards a “disposable” culture, is causing nightmares to municipal authorities across the region and beyond.

Plastic consumption has grown at a tremendous rate over the past two decades as plastics now play an important role in all aspects of modern lifestyle. Plastics are used in the manufacture of numerous products such as protective packaging, lightweight and safety components in cars, mobile phones, insulation materials in buildings, domestic appliances, furniture items, medical devices etc. Because plastic does not decompose biologically, the amount of plastic waste in our surroundings is steadily increasing. More than 90% of the articles found on the sea beaches contain plastic. Plastic waste is often the most objectionable kind of litter and will be visible for months in landfill sites without degrading.

Recycling Process

After PET plastic containers are collected they must be sorted and prepared for sale. The amount and type of sorting and processing required will depend upon purchaser specifications and the extent to which consumers separate recyclable materials of different types and remove contaminants.

Collected PET plastic containers are delivered to a materials recovery facility to begin the recycling process. Sorting and grinding alone are not sufficient preparation of PET bottles and containers for re-manufacturing. There are many items that are physically attached to the PET bottle or containers that require further processing for their removal. These items include the plastic cups on the bottom of many carbonated beverage bottles (known as base cups), labels and caps.

Dirty regrind is processed into a form that can be used by converters. At a reclaiming facility, the dirty flake passes through a series of sorting and cleaning stages to separate PET from other materials that may be contained on the bottle or from contaminants that might be present. First, regrind material is passed through an air classifier which removes materials lighter than the PET such as plastic or paper labels and fines.

The flakes are then washed with a special detergent in a scrubber. This step removes food residue that might remain on the inside surface of PET bottles and containers, glue that is used to adhere labels to the PET containers, and any dirt that might be present. Next, the flakes pass through a “float/sink” classifier. During this process, PET flakes, which are heavier than water, sink in the classifier, while base cups made from high-density polyethylene plastic (HDPE) and caps and rings made from polypropylene plastic (PP), both of which are lighter than water, float to the top.

After drying, the PET flakes pass through an electrostatic separator, which produces a magnetic field to separate PET flakes from any aluminum that might be present as a result of bottle caps and tennis ball can lids and rings. Once all of these processing steps have been completed, the PET plastic is now in a form known as “clean flake.” In some cases reclaimers will further process clean flake in a “repelletizing” stage, which turns the flake into “pellet.” Clean PET flake or pellet is then processed by reclaimers or converters which transform the flake or pellet into a commodity-grade raw material form such as fiber, sheet, or engineered or compounded pellet, which is finally sold to end-users to manufacture new products.

 

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

EcoMENA – Vision and Mission

The MENA region is plagued by a host of issues including water scarcity, waste disposal, food security, industrial pollution and desertification. Providing free access to quality information and knowledge-based resources motivates youngsters in a big way. EcoMENA provides encouragement to masses in tackling major environmental challenges by empowering them with knowledge and by providing them a solid platform to share their views with the outside world.

Salman Zafar, Founder of EcoMENA, talks to the Florentine Association of International Relations (FAIR) about the vision, aims, objectives and rationale behind the creation of EcoMENA. The original version of the interview can be viewed at http://goo.gl/dnfa4K

 

FAIR: What is EcoMENA and what is its primary mission?

Salman Zafar: EcoMENA came into existence in early 2012 with the primary aim to raise environmental awareness in the MENA region and provide a one-stop destination for high-quality information on environment, energy, waste, water, sustainability and related areas.

EcoMENA has made remarkable progress within a short period of time and has huge knowledge base in English as well as Arabic catering to all aspects of sustainability sector, including renewable energy, resource conservation, waste management, environment protection and water management.

FAIR: How did the idea of such an activity come from?

Salman Zafar: While doing research sometimes back, I noticed lack of easily-accessible information on Middle East environmental sector. EcoMENA was launched to empower masses with updated information on Middle East sustainability sector and latest developments taking place worldwide.

EcoMENA is an online information powerhouse freely accessible to anyone having an interest in sustainable development. Our articles, reports and analyses are well-researched, well-written and of the highest professional standards.

FAIR: What is the “state of the art” in the field of sustainability and environment protection in the MENA countries?

Salman Zafar: Unfortunately environment protection is not given due importance by regional countries, though there has been some high-profile initiatives like Masdar City in Abu Dhabi. Sustainability is, no doubt, making its way in the Middle East but the progress has been slow and unsatisfactory.

The MENA region is plagued by a host of issues including water scarcity, waste disposal, food security, industrial pollution and desertification. A regional initiative with a multi-pronged strategy is urgently required to protect the environment and conserve scarce natural resources.

FAIR: What are EcoMENA aims and initiatives for the future?

Salman Zafar: One of the major objectives of EcoMENA is to provide a strong platform for Middle East youngsters to showcase their talents. We are mentoring young students and providing them opportunities to display their innovativeness, creativity and dedication towards environment protection.

Providing free access to quality information and knowledge-based resources motivates youngsters in a big way. EcoMENA provides encouragement to people in tackling major environmental challenges by empowering them with knowledge and by providing them a solid platform to share their views with the outside world. With soaring popularity of social media, networking plays a vital role in assimilation of ideas, knowledge-sharing, scientific thinking and creativeness.

We have a strong pool of expert writers from different parts of the world, and remarkably supported by a handful of volunteers from across the MENA region. Apart from being an information portal, EcoMENA also provide expert guidance and mentorship to entrepreneurs, researchers, students and general public.

FAIR: Do you think there is enough attention and sensitiveness in the sustainable development?

Salman Zafar: Things are slowly, but steadily, changing in most of the MENA countries and a more concerted and organized effort is required to bring about a real change in the prevalent environmental scenario.

A green MENA requires proactive approach from all stakeholders including governments, corporates and general public. Strong environmental laws, promotion of clean energy and eco-friendly projects, reducing reliance on fossil fuels, institutional support and funding, implementing resource conservation, raising environmental awareness and fostering entrepreneurial initiatives are some of the measures that may herald a ‘green revolution’ in the region.

FAIR: In your opinion, what is the “added value” of your mission?

Salman Zafar: EcoMENA endeavor to create mass awareness about the need for clean and green environment in the Middle East through articles, projects, events and campaigns. EcoMENA is counted among the best and most popular Middle East sustainability initiatives with wide following across the world.

Our goal is to transform EcoMENA into a regional cleantech and environmental hub by providing quality information, professional solutions and high level of motivation to people from all walks of life.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

الاستدامة البيئية في الإسلام

إن المعتقدات، التقاليد والقيم الإسلامية وفرت حلول فعالة وشاملة لمواجهة العديد من التحديات البيئية الحالية التي تواجه الجنس البشري. لقد أكد الإسلام على أهمية المحافظة على البيئة وحماية الموارد الطبيعية. ووفقا لتعاليم الشريعة الإسلامية, فإن العناصر الأساسية للطبيعة – الأرض، الماء، النار، الغابات والضوء- تعود ملكيتها إلى جميع الكائنات الحية وليس فقط للجنس البشري.

إن القرآن الكريم والسنة النبوية الشريفة يعتبران نبراسا في تعزيز مفهوم التنمية المستدامة في الدول الإسلامية، وكذلك في جميع أنحاء العالم. أمر الله سبحانه وتعالى البشر بتجنب إلحاق الأذى وهدر الموارد الطبيعية والذي من شأنه تدمير وتدهور البيئة. إن الله سبحانه وتعالى ميز الجنس البشري باستغلال الموارد الطبيعية وجعله كوصي عليها، وهذا يندرج تحته ضمان الحق في استخدام كافة الموارد على أن لا يلحق بها الضرر  والتدمير.

القرآن الكريم والبيئة

أشار القرآن الكريم في العديد من السور والآيات الكريمة إلى مفهم البيئة والى بعض المبادئ الهامة للحفاظ عليها, حيث وضع قواعد عامة تحدد مدى استفادة الإنسان من الموارد الطبيعية المختلفة. المبدأ الأول الذي يوجه التعاليم الإسلامية نحو الاستدامة البيئية وهو ما يرف بمفهوم "الوصاية". كون الإنسان يعتبر الخليفة أو "الوصي" حيث يمكنه الانتفاع بما خلق الله من خيرات دون إسراف أو تبذير لانها ليست خاصة به وحده بل للمجتمع وللأجيال القادمة.فيجب عليه اتخاذ جميع الخطوات والتدابير اللازمة لضمان حفظ وصيانة تلك الممتلكات والتأكد من تمريرها إلى الأجيال اللاحقة بأفضل شكل ممكن. لذا اعتبر الإسلام أن الإنسان هو خادم للطبيعة ويجب أن يتعايش بانسجام مع كافة المخلوقات الأخرى. لذا فمن واجب المسلمين جميعا احترام ورعاية والحفاظ على البيئة.

إن الفساد بجميع أنواعه، بما فيه الفساد البيئي والذي يشمل التلوث الصناعي، الإضرار بالبيئة، والتهور وسوء إدارة الموارد الطبيعية مكروه من الله سبحانه وتعالى.

قال الله تعالى في القرآن الكريم:

"ويسعون في الأرض فساداً والله لا يحب المفسدين" – سورة المائدة، آية – 64

"ولا تفسدوا في الأرض بعد إصلحها ذلكم خير لكم إن كنتم مؤمنين" – سورة الأعراف، آية  – 85

"يبني آدم خذوا زينتكم عند كل مسجد وكلوا واشربوا ولا تسرفوا إنه لا يحب المسرفين" – سورة الأعراف، آية – 31

"ولا تبغ الفساد في الأرض إن الله لا يحب المفسدين" – سورة القصص، آية –  77

وفقا للقرآن الكريم، فإن الحفاظ على البيئة يعتبر واجب ديني وكذلك التزام اجتماعي، ولا يعتبر مسألة اختيارية. إن استغلال أي من الموارد الطبيعية يدرج تحت بند المسآلة والحفاظ على تلك الموارد.

الحديث النبوي الشريف والبيئة

إن الأحاديث النبوية الشريفة وتعاليم وتقاليد سيدنا محمد (صلى الله عليه وسلم) تناولت بشكل واسع العديد من الجوانب البيئية كالحفاظ على المصادر الطبيعية، واستصلاح الأراضي، والحفاظ على نظافة البيئة، حيث نهى سيدنا محمد (صلى الله عليه وسلم)  عن الإسراف في الاستهلاك والبذخ والترف وحث على الاعتدال في جميع مناحي الحياة, وهذا ما أكد عليه القرآن الكريم.

كما نهى سيدنا محمد(صلى الله عليه وسلم)  عن قطع الأشجار وتدمير المحاصيل حتى في أوقات الحرب وإن كان وجودها ذا فائدة للعدو. وأولى سيدنا محمد أهميه كبيرة للزراعة المستدامة للأراضي وكيفية تعامل الإنسان مع الحيوانات والحفاظ على المصادر الطبيعية وحماية البيئة البرية.  إن من أقوال الرسول محمد (صلى الله عليه وسلم) بشأن الاستدامة البيئية:

 قال انس رضي الله عنه عن النبي صلى الله عليه وسلم: ( ما من مسلم يغرس غرسا او يزرع زرعا فيأكل منه إنسان أو بهيمة إلا كان له به صدقه)

قال أبي أيوب الأنصاري رضي الله عنه عن النبي صلى الله عليه وسلم: ( ما من رجل يغرس غرسا إلا كتب الله له من الأجر قدر ما يخرج من ثمر ذلك الغرس)

قال رسول الله صلى الله عليه وسلم: ( من نصب شجرة فصبر على حفظها والقيام عليها حتى تثمر كان له في كل شيء يصاب من ثمرها صدقة عند الله عز وجل)  .

أكد سيدنا محمد (صلى الله عليه وسلم) على ضرورة الاقتصاد والاعتدال  وعدم الإسراف والإفراط  في التعامل مع الموارد الطبيعية. ومن اجل حماية الأراضي والغابات والحياة البرية، أنشأ سيدنا محمد (صلى الله عليه وسلم)   مناطق محمية عرفت بـ "الحرم" و " الحمى" والتي ضمن حدودها لا يتم المساس بالموارد الطبيعية خلال فترات زمنية محددة. إن ما يعرف بـ "الحرم" هي المناطق المحيطة بمصادر المياه أنشئت بهدف حماية المياه الجوفية من الاستنزاف والاستخدام الجائر، أما بالنسبة للـ "الحمى" يطلق على البيئة البرية والغابات وهي مناطق يمنع فيها الرعي وقطع الأخشاب وفيها يتم حماية أنواع معين من الحيوانات مثل الإبل.

انشأ سيدنا محمد(صلى الله عليه وسلم)  ما يسمى بـ "الحمى" إلى الجنوب من المدينة المنورة ومنع خلال أوقات معينة في تلك المناطق الصيد داخل دائرة نصف قطرها أربعة أميال، ومنع فيها قع الأشجار والنباتات داخل دائرة نصف قطرها اثني عشر ميلاً. إن إنشاء تلك المناطق المحرمة يدل على الأهمية التي أولاها الرسول للإدارة والاستخدام المستدام  للموارد الطبيعية وحماية البيئة البرية والأراضي الزراعية.

 

ترجمة: مها الزعبي, طالبة دكتوراه( كلية التصميم البيئي –  جامعة كالجري, كندا)

للمزيد من المعلومات:  (http://evds.ucalgary.ca/profiles/maha-al-zu-bi)

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Significance of E-Waste Management

Electronic waste (or e-waste) is the fastest growing waste stream, and its disposal is a major environmental concern in all parts of the world. More than 50 million tons of e-waste is generated every year with major fraction finding its way to landfills and dumpsites. E-waste comprises as much as 8% of the municipal solid waste stream in rich nations, such as those in GCC. Globally only 15 – 20 percent of e-waste is recycled while the rest is dumped into developing countries. However, in the Middle East, merely 5 percent of e-waste is sent to recycling facilities (which are located in Asia, Africa and South America) while the rest ends up in landfills.

What is E-Waste

The term ‘e-waste’ stands for any electrical or electronic appliance that has reached its end-of-life, such as refrigerators, washing machines, microwaves, cell phones, TVs and computers. Such waste is made up of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, plastics, glass, wood, circuit boards, ceramics, rubber etc. The major constituent of e-waste is iron and steel (about 50%) followed by plastics (21%), and non-ferrous metals (13%) like copper, aluminum and precious metals like silver, gold, platinum, palladium etc. E-waste also contains toxic elements like lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, selenium and chromium.

E-waste is different from municipal and industrial wastes and requires special handling procedures due to the presence of both valuable and expensive materials. Recycling of e-waste can help in the recovery of reusable components and base materials, especially copper and precious metals. However, due to lack of recycling facilities, high labour costs, and tough environmental regulations, rich countries either landfill or export e-waste to poor countries which is illegal under the Basel Convention.

Health Hazards

Recycling techniques for e-waste include burning and dissolution in strong acids with few measures to protect human health and the environment. E-waste workers often suffer from bad health effects through skin contact and inhalation. Workers, consumers and communities are exposed to the chemicals contained in electronics throughout their life cycle, from manufacture through use and disposal. The incineration, land-filling, and illegal dumping of electronic wastes all contribute toxic chemicals to the environment.

Electronics recycling workers have been shown to have higher levels of flame retardants in their blood, potentially from exposure to contaminated indoor air. Similar exposures are likely for communities where recycling plants are located, especially if these plants are not adequately regulated. Much of the electronics industry in the Middle East, Europe and North America has outsourced manufacturing and disposal to developing countries of Southeast Asia, China and India. Uncontrolled management of e-wastes is having a highly negative effect on local communities and environment in these countries.

E-Waste Recycling and Metal Industry

Electrical and electronic equipment are made up a wide range of materials including metals, plastics and ceramics. For example, a mobile phone may contain more than 40 elements including base metals like copper and tin, special metals such as cobalt, indium and antimony, and precious metals like silver, gold and palladium. Infact, metals represents almost one-fourth of the weight of a phone, the remainder being plastic and ceramic material. Taking into account the fact that worldwide mobile device sale totaled 1.8 billion in 2010, this will translate into significant metal demand each year.

If we consider the high growth rate of electronic devices, including cell phones, TVs, monitors, MP3 players, digital cameras and electronic toys, it becomes obvious that these equipment are responsible for high demand and high prices for a wide range of metals. These metal resources are available again at final end-of-life of the device which could be used for manufacture of new products if effective recycling methods are implemented.

Mining plays a vital role in the supply of metals for electrical and electronic industry. The environmental impact of metal production is significant, especially for precious and special metals. For example, to produce 1 ton of gold or palladium, 10,000 tons of carbon dioxide is generated. If recycling processes are used to recover metals from e-waste, only a fraction of CO2 emissions will occur, apart from numerous other benefits.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter